Cybersecurity for the C suite executive (CEO, CFO,COO)

Cybersecurity for the C suite executive (CEO, CFO, COO).

Lets look at the facts!

No matter the size, shape or industry of an organisation.

No one is fully prepared for a full-on, bare knuckles, cyber ninja assault.

We are not talking about a random attack.

An attack that is being perpetrated against your organisation with Metasploit and a new copy of Kali.

This attack is from Mr. Creepy!

He knows what he is doing.

He knows what he is after.

But, more importantly, he also knows how to get it.

He has studied your organisation for months to find your weaknesses.

He has the skills and resources (very important) to break in and steal your crown jewels.

These are the people who give my industry grey hairs and stress lines.

Thinking that there is no way that you would be targeted by a professional is a grave mistake.

Because It no longer needs to be a professional!

They are quite happy to train others in the required skills.

They are quite happy to sell others their expertise.

They are quite happy to tell others where they are going wrong.

They have created capabilities and skills that they have incorporated into something to sell.

This increases the capability of the inexperienced cybercriminal immensely.

Want to avoid being on the radar as a prime target then YOU NEED TO DO SOMETHING.

Here is something to start with.

Cybersecurity checklist

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Where to start your Business Security / Cybersecurity Journey

Start


Time

3-hour program

What is done

Audit on assets and risk management.

What you get

  • Report on where your organisation is in relation to business security
  • Roadmap to implement basic changes to your business organisation
  • A number of process, procedure and policy templates
  • A number of Plans templates

Tools we use

  • Care-app diagnostic tool
  • Questionnaire similar to basic SWOT
  • Proprietary diagnostic tools
  • Open-source intelligence gathering tools

What do you need to do

  • Implement changes
  • Discuss with management
  • Implement proactive responses to cybersecurity

 

Threshold


Time

8-hour program

What is done

 

What you get

  • Implementation of Internet policy
  • Implementation of online security awareness program
  • In depth Risk analysis
  • In depth Risk mitigation process
  • Full blown digital SWOT

Tools we use

 

What do you need to do

 

 

Baseline

What is done

 

What you get

 

What do you need to do

 

 

Beyond

What is done

 

What you get

 

What do you need to do

 

 

Why you need an off-site backup

Off-site, secure, out of band backups are your only hope for recovery in a cyber event

Ransomware, the scourge of today’s business, is literally a click away from crippling your business and organisation.

Attackers can reportedly execute the malware and begin encrypting most file types and removing all local backups. It is still unclear how much the demanded ransom is, but researchers have found that TFlower doesn’t append the encrypted files’ extensions.” Connor Madsen webroot. https://www.webroot.com/blog/2019/09/20/cyber-news-rundown-tflower-ransomware-exploiting-rdp

A determined crypto-virus attack on your organisation can reduce the organisations chance to make money, it can impact your reputation and can cause problems for months if not years.

Even an accidental infection, most result from an accident, can cause similar effects.

In the event of a crypto-virus attack, especially for small and medium enterprises, you have 2 options.

  • You pay the ransom – you may get your data back, you may get some of it back or you may get none of it back, we are after all talking about a criminal organisation that is holding your data to ransom.
  • You recover from your backup.

Paying the ransom is up to you, most security and ICT companies will say not to pay.

If you have a security or ICT company, or someone in your organisation that does the job they would have told you to do a backup.

Your back up has to cover the following:

  • It should be regular – depending on your requirements for the data and access to the data a back up should be completed every 24 hours.   A better solution is to have an incremental backup every 15 minutes.
  • It should have no human intervention – the backup has to run no matter what.  If you are backing up to a hard drive, connected to your device and you require someone to change drives then human error comes into it.   The old adage that the backup will fail the same day you need it is true.
  • It should be off-site – As in totally away from the business but also not connected to the business except when it is doing a backup.
  • It should be secure – all the data, no matter where it is stored should have encryption wrapped around it.   It should be encrypted at rest (stored on the location), it should be encrypted in transport (getting there and back) and it should be encrypted if you are going to use it.  This stops the information being stolen but also being accidentally accessed by the provider.
  • It should be tested regularly – you have done a backup and that’s all I have to do.   No, you need to test it regularly.   Do a regular restore to test that it works and also to ensure that you are backing up ALL of your essential data.   You do not want to be in a situation where a failure is your first test.

Achieving all of these components is difficult.   Try talking to us or a reputable ICT and security provider concerning your options!

Click here for your free trial of a secure, out of band off-site backup solution.